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The Underwater Seascapes winner. © Andy Schmid (Switzerland)
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‘Tides Are Changing’: Meet the Winners of the UN’s 10th Annual World Oceans Day Photo Competition

Home » photography » ‘Tides Are Changing’: Meet the Winners of the UN’s 10th Annual World Oceans Day Photo Competition
The Underwater Seascapes winner. © Andy Schmid (Switzerland)
The Underwater Seascapes winner.
© Andy Schmid (Switzerland)

Our world’s oceans are stunning, so what better way to capture their wide array of colors, personalities and awe-inspiring vastness than through the art of photography?


This year, the 10th Annual Photo Competition for United Nations World Ocean Day (UN WOD) received thousands of photo submissions from around the world surrounding the theme, “Planet Ocean: Tides Are Changing.”

Six first-place winners were selected and announced by actor and activist Lucas Bravo and the respective judges during the live broadcast of UN WOD at New York’s UN headquarters on June 8.

The free competition launched in March and explored six thematic categories connected with the overarching theme of the 2023 UN WOD; they are: No Time to Waste, Putting the Ocean First, The Wonderful World of Tides, Ocean Is Life, Big & Small Underwater Faces and Underwater Seascapes.

The judges selected first-, second-, and third-place winners for each category. World-renowned judges included wildlife photographer Rathika Ramasamy from India, underwater fine art wildlife photographer Ipah Uid Lynn from Malaysia, filmmaker and director Antoine Janssens from Switzerland, and wildlife photographer Rajan Desai of the United States.

The thousands of entries received for the 10th annual photo competition came from both professional and amateur photographers worldwide.

The photo competition was a collaboration between the United Nations Division for Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO, Ellen Cuylaerts, Nausicaa, Oceanic Global and Dive Photo Guide (DPG).

Without further ado, here are the winning photographs for 2023, taken by photographers hailing from more than 14 different countries.

No Time to Waste

First Place: Álvaro Herrero (Mekan), Spain

Humpback Whale. Pacific Ocean, Baja California, Mexico. © Álvaro Herrero (Mekan) (Spain)
Humpback Whale. Pacific Ocean, Baja California, Mexico.
© Álvaro Herrero (Mekan) (Spain)

“A humpback whale with a buoy entangled to its tail, already decomposed, dies slowly and agonizingly,” Herrero said in an artist’s statement published on DPG. “A clear reflection of the slow and painful death that we are giving to our oceans, our planet.”

Second Place: Simon Lorenz, Germany

Photographer statement: Sea turtles face a multitude of man-made threats. The plastic trash floating in the ocean is often mistaken as food by sea turtles like this Olive Ridley in Sri Lanka. After ingesting the plastic the turtles become too buoyant to dive. With their carapace floating above the water they eventually dry out and die of heat and starvation. © Simon Lorenz (Germany)
Photographer statement: Sea turtles face a multitude of man-made threats. The plastic trash floating in the ocean is often mistaken as food by sea turtles like this Olive Ridley in Sri Lanka. After ingesting the plastic the turtles become too buoyant to dive. With their carapace floating above the water they eventually dry out and die of heat and starvation.
© Simon Lorenz (Germany)

Third Place: Ines Goovaerts, Belgium

Photographer statement: Behold the mouth of the Ishëm River in Albania, one of the top 3 most polluted rivers in Europe. Due to issues related to waste management in this area, a total of 700000 kg of plastic trash every year ends up in the Adriatic Sea. © Ines Goovaerts (Belgium)
Photographer statement: Behold the mouth of the Ishëm River in Albania, one of the top 3 most polluted rivers in Europe. Due to issues related to waste management in this area, a total of 700000 kg of plastic trash every year ends up in the Adriatic Sea.
© Ines Goovaerts (Belgium)

Putting the Ocean First

First Place: Tom Shlesinger, Israel

Checking out a coral nursery. Gulf of Aqaba and Eilat, northern Red Sea. © Tom Shlesinger (Israel)
Checking out a coral nursery. Gulf of Aqaba and Eilat, northern Red Sea.
© Tom Shlesinger (Israel)

“Although the hawksbill sea turtle is critically endangered, it is quite common in the Gulf of Aqaba and Eilat, northern Red Sea,” Shlesinger said in a statement on DPG. “This sea turtle is among the smallest of all sea turtles and its diet is diverse, ranging from sponges and soft corals to jellyfish, crustaceans, and more. Here, a hawksbill sea turtle checking out a coral nursery dubbed ‘the igloo’. This dome-shaped artificial reef was built and placed in the sea more than two decades ago. Quickly after corals were transplanted onto the igloo, many more established themselves naturally, which in turn attracted numerous species of fishes and other animals to visit and inhabit the structure.”

Second Place: Edwar Herreño Parra, Colombia

Photographer statement: “Full hands”: Marine Biologist Eduardo Espinosa, boat captain and a volunteer helping to oxygenate these shark pups before they are released. That day they capture 11 individuals and after conducting different studies (size, sex, biosamples, and installing numeric tags in the dorsal fin), they were successfully released. Teamwork is a very important key for the success of this expedition since they have only a couple of minutes to run all studies. After two minutes the shark can die from suffocation. A few years ago, Eduardo Espinosa, an Ecuadorian marine biologist and Galapagos’ Park ranger discovered one of the most important shark nursery areas in the heart of the Galapagos Island. Getting all the way there is quite a task that only a small craft boat can do, in high tide. On my first visit I just couldn’t believe that a place like this even exist, it was like being in a cartoon movie: babies’ sharks of many species, baby rays, and baby turtles in large numbers but especially hammerhead and black tip sharks. As a marine biologist, I’ve been in other mangroves/nursery areas, but nothing compared to this one. This is one of the most important providers of life for the ocean. Eduardo is conducting important studies to create management plans for the conservation of endangered marine species and thanks to people like Eduardo and other NGO’s, the government of Ecuador expanded the Galapagos national park protected area in November 2021, they created new MPA (marine protected areas) and it was a good role model for other countries in the area that follows this important actions. This year, Costa Rica expanded Cocos island national park, then Colombia expanded Malpelo Island, and together created the first trans-national marine corridor from Cocos Island (Costa Rica) to Galapagos Island (Ecuador). © Edwar Herreño Parra (Colombia)
Photographer statement: “Full hands”: Marine Biologist Eduardo Espinosa, boat captain and a volunteer helping to oxygenate these shark pups before they are released. That day they capture 11 individuals and after conducting different studies (size, sex, biosamples, and installing numeric tags in the dorsal fin), they were successfully released. Teamwork is a very important key for the success of this expedition since they have only a couple of minutes to run all studies. After two minutes the shark can die from suffocation. A few years ago, Eduardo Espinosa, an Ecuadorian marine biologist and Galapagos’ Park ranger discovered one of the most important shark nursery areas in the heart of the Galapagos Island. Getting all the way there is quite a task that only a small craft boat can do, in high tide. On my first visit I just couldn’t believe that a place like this even exist, it was like being in a cartoon movie: babies’ sharks of many species, baby rays, and baby turtles in large numbers but especially hammerhead and black tip sharks. As a marine biologist, I’ve been in other mangroves/nursery areas, but nothing compared to this one. This is one of the most important providers of life for the ocean. Eduardo is conducting important studies to create management plans for the conservation of endangered marine species and thanks to people like Eduardo and other NGO’s, the government of Ecuador expanded the Galapagos national park protected area in November 2021, they created new MPA (marine protected areas) and it was a good role model for other countries in the area that follows this important actions. This year, Costa Rica expanded Cocos island national park, then Colombia expanded Malpelo Island, and together created the first trans-national marine corridor from Cocos Island (Costa Rica) to Galapagos Island (Ecuador).
© Edwar Herreño Parra (Colombia)

Third Place: Edwar Herreño Parra, Colombia

Photographer statement: “Eyes on future”: Marine Biologist ensuring that the hammerhead shark pup (Scalloped Hammerhead shark – Sphyrna lewini) he has just released, is in perfect condition. The water was cold but the biologist’s goal is to make sure all the sharks we caught that day (11), resume normal activities, including breathing. The biologist is conducting important studies to save this species that is critically endangered of extinction. It is estimated that only in the last decade, the population of this shark has fallen by more than 90%. Sharks fining is the major threat for sharks, in this picture, ironically, you see a dorsal fin alone in the reflection above, without the yellow numeric tag installed for the biologist… it is the dark shadow that chases this species of sharks, they are killed for just for their fins to make shark fin soup in Asia. A few years ago, Eduardo Espinosa, an Ecuadorian marine biologist and Galapagos’ Park ranger discovered one of the most important shark nursery areas right in the heart of the Galapagos Island (Santa Cruz Island) – Ecuador. Getting all the way there is quite a task that only a small craft boat can do, in high tide. On my first visit I just couldn’t believe that a place like this even exist, it was like being in a cartoon movie: babies’ sharks of many species, baby rays and baby turtles all of them in large numbers but especially hammerhead and black tip sharks. As a marine biologist, I’ve been in other mangroves/nursery areas, but nothing compared to this one. This is one of the most important providers of life for the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Eduardo is conducting important studies to create management plans for the conservation of endangered marine species and thanks to people like Eduardo and other NGO’s, the government of Ecuador expanded the Galapagos national park protected area in November 2021, they created new MPAs (marine protected areas) in the cost of Ecuador and it was a good role model for other countries in the area that follows this important actions. Last year, Costa Rica expanded Cocos island national park, then Colombia expanded Malpelo Island and together created the first trans-national marine corridor from Cocos Island (Costa Rica) to Galapagos Island (Ecuador). Finally, the authorities realized that it isn’t enough to reinforce the protection of endangered migratory species in the National Parks where these species are protected but totally vulnerable as soon as they leave protected areas. The creation of this marine corridor for migratory species is a big step forward to recovering populations of threatened and endangered species such as Hammerhead sharks. I took this picture a few months before the Covid pandemic crisis; 2020 was one of the worst years for the Galapagos Islands due to the fishing pressure where thousands of fishing boats surrounded this national park. This species is on the IUCN red list (Critically Endangered). © Edwar Herreño Parra (Colombia)
Photographer statement: “Eyes on future”: Marine Biologist ensuring that the hammerhead shark pup (Scalloped Hammerhead shark – Sphyrna lewini) he has just released, is in perfect condition. The water was cold but the biologist’s goal is to make sure all the sharks we caught that day (11), resume normal activities, including breathing. The biologist is conducting important studies to save this species that is critically endangered of extinction. It is estimated that only in the last decade, the population of this shark has fallen by more than 90%. Sharks fining is the major threat for sharks, in this picture, ironically, you see a dorsal fin alone in the reflection above, without the yellow numeric tag installed for the biologist… it is the dark shadow that chases this species of sharks, they are killed for just for their fins to make shark fin soup in Asia. A few years ago, Eduardo Espinosa, an Ecuadorian marine biologist and Galapagos’ Park ranger discovered one of the most important shark nursery areas right in the heart of the Galapagos Island (Santa Cruz Island) – Ecuador. Getting all the way there is quite a task that only a small craft boat can do, in high tide. On my first visit I just couldn’t believe that a place like this even exist, it was like being in a cartoon movie: babies’ sharks of many species, baby rays and baby turtles all of them in large numbers but especially hammerhead and black tip sharks. As a marine biologist, I’ve been in other mangroves/nursery areas, but nothing compared to this one. This is one of the most important providers of life for the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Eduardo is conducting important studies to create management plans for the conservation of endangered marine species and thanks to people like Eduardo and other NGO’s, the government of Ecuador expanded the Galapagos national park protected area in November 2021, they created new MPAs (marine protected areas) in the cost of Ecuador and it was a good role model for other countries in the area that follows this important actions. Last year, Costa Rica expanded Cocos island national park, then Colombia expanded Malpelo Island and together created the first trans-national marine corridor from Cocos Island (Costa Rica) to Galapagos Island (Ecuador). Finally, the authorities realized that it isn’t enough to reinforce the protection of endangered migratory species in the National Parks where these species are protected but totally vulnerable as soon as they leave protected areas. The creation of this marine corridor for migratory species is a big step forward to recovering populations of threatened and endangered species such as Hammerhead sharks. I took this picture a few months before the Covid pandemic crisis; 2020 was one of the worst years for the Galapagos Islands due to the fishing pressure where thousands of fishing boats surrounded this national park. This species is on the IUCN red list (Critically Endangered).
© Edwar Herreño Parra (Colombia)

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The Wonderful World of Tides

First Place: Chris Gug, United States

High Tide, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. © Chris Gug (USA)
High Tide, Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. © Chris Gug (USA)

“While scouting over the ocean for the aggregation of mobula rays off the coast of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico with my drone day after day, I came across the most beautifully powerful shorebreak where the massive waves crashed directly onto the sand,” Gug said in an artist’s statement on DPG. “Having captured plenty of images of the mobula schools, I set my attention to capturing images of the waves, but was immediately disappointed as they seemed to now be breaking about 20 meters out from the beach line, and no longer created the churning of the sand that I found so beautiful the day before. I came to realize that it was now low tide, and rocks a ways out were crumbling the waves and destroying the barrel due to the lower water levels. A quick Google search gave me the time of the peak high tide, and I returned yet another day to find the waves forming beautiful barrels energetically exploding directly on the beach, and sucking huge amounts of sand with each impact.”

Second Place: Sina Ritter, Germany

Photographer statement: Witnessing the sheer delight of experiencing the ocean’s embrace, as a tiny black sea turtle hatchling takes its very first steps into the surf of Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula. Bathed in the golden glow of the setting sun, this little adventurer takes advantage of the high tide, making its journey shorter and escaping the watchful eyes of predators. © Sina Ritter (Germany)
Photographer statement: Witnessing the sheer delight of experiencing the ocean’s embrace, as a tiny black sea turtle hatchling takes its very first steps into the surf of Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula. Bathed in the golden glow of the setting sun, this little adventurer takes advantage of the high tide, making its journey shorter and escaping the watchful eyes of predators.
© Sina Ritter (Germany)

Third Place: Alex Permiakov, Russia

Photographer statement: The photo was captured in Bali, Indonesia. It was a beautiful sunset and I was mesmerized by a group of surfers jumping on the waves. After waiting for the right moment I managed to capture this photo. The photo captures a surfer suspended in mid-air, showcasing the profound connection between their exhilarating leap and the powerful tides. As the surfer gracefully rides the waves, they harness the energy and motion generated by the ebb and flow of the tides. It serves as a vivid testament to the inseparable relationship between surfers and the dynamic forces of nature, highlighting how tides propel and shape the thrilling experiences enjoyed by surfers worldwide. © Alex Permiakov (Russia)
Photographer statement: The photo was captured in Bali, Indonesia. It was a beautiful sunset and I was mesmerized by a group of surfers jumping on the waves. After waiting for the right moment I managed to capture this photo. The photo captures a surfer suspended in mid-air, showcasing the profound connection between their exhilarating leap and the powerful tides. As the surfer gracefully rides the waves, they harness the energy and motion generated by the ebb and flow of the tides. It serves as a vivid testament to the inseparable relationship between surfers and the dynamic forces of nature, highlighting how tides propel and shape the thrilling experiences enjoyed by surfers worldwide.
© Alex Permiakov (Russia)

Ocean Is Life

First Place: Shane Gross, Canada

Gathering Sea Urchins, Bali, Indonesia. © Shane Gross (Canada)
Gathering Sea Urchins, Bali, Indonesia.
© Shane Gross (Canada)

“A mother and son gather sea urchins for their family at low tide in a seagrass meadow in Bali, Indonesia,” Gross said, describing the photo on DPG. “Seagrass is an often overlooked coastal habitat important for food security, biodiversity, storm protection, and fisheries. Seagrass meadows also store carbon more efficiently than rainforests helping in our fight against climate change. Seagrass is something conservationists and fishers agree needs to be protected.”

Second place: Niklas Manger, Germany

Photographer statement: In this image, we see the timeless dance of the humpback whales, a dance that has been performed for centuries in the depths of the ocean. The touching of their pectoral fins seems almost like a gesture of affection, reminding us of the strong emotional connections that exist between these intelligent and sentient beings. This photograph captures a fleeting moment of intimacy in the vastness of the ocean in Cabo San Lucas, inviting us to witness the beauty of nature at its most raw and profound. Reminding us of the importance of living in harmony with our environment. © Niklas Manger (Germany)
Photographer statement: In this image, we see the timeless dance of the humpback whales, a dance that has been performed for centuries in the depths of the ocean. The touching of their pectoral fins seems almost like a gesture of affection, reminding us of the strong emotional connections that exist between these intelligent and sentient beings. This photograph captures a fleeting moment of intimacy in the vastness of the ocean in Cabo San Lucas, inviting us to witness the beauty of nature at its most raw and profound. Reminding us of the importance of living in harmony with our environment.
© Niklas Manger (Germany)

Third place: Rachel Moore, United States

Photographer statement: For the past two decades, French Polynesia has been a leader in marine conservation, proudly holding the title of the world’s largest shark sanctuary. Their commitment to expanding protection measures to over 350,000 square miles by 2030 is truly inspirational. The positive impact of their conservation efforts is evident in the abundant shark populations and thriving reefs of the remote Tuamotu islands. Sharks play a crucial role in regulating oceanic biodiversity, making their preservation critical for a healthy ocean ecosystem and the survival of human beings. French Polynesia’s dedication to protecting these apex predators is a shining example to the world, reminding us all of our responsibility to safeguard our planet’s natural wonders. Their unwavering commitment to marine conservation is a beacon of hope, inspiring us all to take action and work together to protect our oceans for future generations. © Rachel Moore (USA)
Photographer statement: For the past two decades, French Polynesia has been a leader in marine conservation, proudly holding the title of the world’s largest shark sanctuary. Their commitment to expanding protection measures to over 350,000 square miles by 2030 is truly inspirational. The positive impact of their conservation efforts is evident in the abundant shark populations and thriving reefs of the remote Tuamotu islands. Sharks play a crucial role in regulating oceanic biodiversity, making their preservation critical for a healthy ocean ecosystem and the survival of human beings. French Polynesia’s dedication to protecting these apex predators is a shining example to the world, reminding us all of our responsibility to safeguard our planet’s natural wonders. Their unwavering commitment to marine conservation is a beacon of hope, inspiring us all to take action and work together to protect our oceans for future generations.
© Rachel Moore (USA)

Big & Small Underwater Faces

First Place: Glenn Ostle, United States

California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus), Sea of Cortez, Mexico. © Glenn Ostle (USA)
California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus), Sea of Cortez, Mexico.
© Glenn Ostle (USA)

“The narrow Sea of Cortez is one of the most biologically diverse bodies of water on the planet. Home to more than nine hundred species of fish, thousands of species of invertebrates, and a wide array of marine life, it so impressed Jacques Cousteau that he referred to it as the ‘aquarium of the world,’” Ostle said in a statement on DPG. “Only a short boat ride from LaPaz, Mexico, is a pair of rocky islets known as Los Islotes. With a population of between four and five hundred animals, it is home to the largest reproductive colony of California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus) in the Sea of Cortez. We were fortunate to visit the islets at a time when huge schools of fish were also in abundance around the islets. The water seemed to boil with life and it was hypnotic to watch the sea lions dart into huge aggregations of silver fish, only to burst back through the schools, splitting, and dividing them. The fish would quickly regroup but so densely that it was often difficult to even see another diver just a few feet away. At times, the sea lions seemed to pause and appear somewhat overwhelmed at the sight of so many fish within easy reach, as this young sea lion seemed to be doing.”

Second Place: Simon Temple, United Kingdom

Photographer statement: This is a common goby, Pomatoschistus microps, inside an urchin shell. The goby is tending eggs laid on the inside of the shell. I captured this image while diving in the marine protected area of Loch Carron in Scotland. Quite often the shells are covered with an unattractive layer of algae however, this shell was incredibly fresh and full of color and obviously caught my eye! © Simon Temple (UK)
Photographer statement: This is a common goby, Pomatoschistus microps, inside an urchin shell. The goby is tending eggs laid on the inside of the shell. I captured this image while diving in the marine protected area of Loch Carron in Scotland. Quite often the shells are covered with an unattractive layer of algae however, this shell was incredibly fresh and full of color and obviously caught my eye!
© Simon Temple (UK)

Third Place: Adriano Morettin, Italy

Photographer statement: During a photographic dive in the Lembeh Strait, Indonesia, last September I saw that on a branch of soft coral, there were some porcelain crabs (Lissoporcellana quadrilobata) that moved continuously. Observing them carefully, I realized that they always stopped in the usual places and that they often approached others of their kind. At this point, I pointed my camera with the snoot mounted on the flash at a section of the soft coral where I had also seen 3 or 4 porcelain crabs together and waited until I was able to take this shot. © Adriano Morettin (Italy)
Photographer statement: During a photographic dive in the Lembeh Strait, Indonesia, last September I saw that on a branch of soft coral, there were some porcelain crabs (Lissoporcellana quadrilobata) that moved continuously. Observing them carefully, I realized that they always stopped in the usual places and that they often approached others of their kind. At this point, I pointed my camera with the snoot mounted on the flash at a section of the soft coral where I had also seen 3 or 4 porcelain crabs together and waited until I was able to take this shot.
© Adriano Morettin (Italy)

Underwater Seascapes

First Place: Andy Schmid, Switzerland

Female Orca, Norway. © Andy Schmid (Switzerland)
Female Orca, Norway.
© Andy Schmid (Switzerland)

“A female Orca splitting a Herring Bait Ball while diving through it to get one, shot from underneath while freediving,” Schmid said in an artist’s statement on DPG. “Every winter enormous schools of Herring migrate from the open ocean into the fjords of Northern Norway and attract large numbers of big predators such as Orcas and Humpback Whales. Witnessing Orcas feeding on Herring using the so-called carousel feeding technique is very exciting but not easy to capture due to various factors: limited light and visibility, fast paced action plus cold surface and water temperature. Being able to freedive and capture the action on an ongoing feeding frenzy in these conditions is difficult but this winter I managed to create a series of photos I had never dreamt of capturing.”

Second Place: Mayumi Takeuchi-Ebbins, United Kingdom

Photographer statement: This is a huge bloom for Moon jellyfish from Alaska. A female Moon jellyfish become ready for mating, she will change color to pink or purple. It is very difficult to find mating female jellyfish from crowd and I was looking for female pretty long time but I knew there is mating ready female while I was in Alaska. Finally, I could find only one pink female and lots of male jellyfish were chasing this pink bride. © Mayumi Takeuchi-Ebbins (UK)
Photographer statement: This is a huge bloom for Moon jellyfish from Alaska. A female Moon jellyfish become ready for mating, she will change color to pink or purple. It is very difficult to find mating female jellyfish from crowd and I was looking for female pretty long time but I knew there is mating ready female while I was in Alaska. Finally, I could find only one pink female and lots of male jellyfish were chasing this pink bride.
© Mayumi Takeuchi-Ebbins (UK)

Third Place: Simon Biddie, United Kingdom

Photographer statement: California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are playful and social. In Los Islotes, Mexico, the island can be surrounded by a dense shoal of sardines, and here, a mother sea lion plays with two sea lion pups. The colony at Los Islotes is unique in the area – estimated at 400 – 800 individuals, it is one of the most stable colonies in the area with sea lion numbers rising. This is due to strict laws and protections as Los Islotes as part of the Espiritu Santo National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site since 2005, and a National Marine Park in 2007. © Simon Biddie (UK)
Photographer statement: California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are playful and social. In Los Islotes, Mexico, the island can be surrounded by a dense shoal of sardines, and here, a mother sea lion plays with two sea lion pups. The colony at Los Islotes is unique in the area – estimated at 400 – 800 individuals, it is one of the most stable colonies in the area with sea lion numbers rising. This is due to strict laws and protections as Los Islotes as part of the Espiritu Santo National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site since 2005, and a National Marine Park in 2007.
© Simon Biddie (UK)

The United Nations World Oceans Day Photo Competition is a tradition that asks photographers and artists from across the planet to share the ocean’s beauty and the significance of each year’s themes. Past years’ winning photos can be viewed here.

UN WOD has been celebrating the importance of the ocean to humans and the planet since its beginnings in 2008. In order to bring the world together to tackle the increasing challenges facing the world’s oceans, humans need to come together globally in order to gain a better understanding of the ocean’s vast, unexplored depths. In that spirit, Indigenous community members, youth activists and scientists joined decision makers, members of civil society, celebrities and others on June 8 at UN Headquarters in New York to celebrate the world’s oceans, and to discuss issues and solutions related to Earth’s greatest uncharted wilderness. The event was hosted by Oceanic Global and the Division for Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea of the Office of Legal Affairs.

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Cristen Hemingway Jaynes at EcoWatch



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