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Thirty South African white rhinos airlifted to Rwanda in the largest single translocation

Thirty South African white rhinos airlifted to Rwanda in the largest single translocation


The rhinos, consisting of 19 females and 11 males aged between four years and 27 years were translocated from South Africa’s Phinda Private Game Reserve to the new home in Akagera National Park in eastern Rwanda as part of a program to replenish the species’ population


The rhinos, consisting of 19 females and 11 males aged between four years and 27 years were translocated from South Africa’s Phinda Private Game Reserve to the new home in Akagera National Park in eastern Rwanda as part of a program to replenish the species’ population, decimated by poaching since the 1970s. The translocation was carried out through collaboration between the Rwanda Development Board (RDB), African Parks with funding from the Howard G. Buffett Foundation.

Rwanda Development Board, which manages the Akagera National Park along with African parks termed the relocation as a historical milestone.

White rhinos are classified as endangered with numbers declining across their natural habitats, largely due to poaching driven by demand for their horns. The southern white rhino, one of two subspecies of white rhino, is critically endangered with about 20,000 individuals remaining. The Northern white rhino, the other subspecies, has all but vanished, with only two females left alive.

African Parks’ CEO Peter Fearnhead said:

Introductions to safe, intact wild landscapes are vital for the future of vulnerable species like the white rhino, which are under considerable human-induced pressures.

Jes Gruner, Park Manager of Akagera national park said that the rhinos were slightly sedated to keep them calm and not aggressive during the journey.

The rhinos weren’t sedated on the plane in the sense they were totally lying down, as that’s bad for their sternums. But they were partly drugged, so they could still stand up and keep their bodily functions normal, but enough to keep them calm and stable.

The introduction of white rhinos to Akagera follows the reintroduction of lions in 2015 and 18 eastern black rhinos in 2017.

Source:

PolarBear on NewsBreak



Road to hell for marine life: Shell’s Wild Coast seismic assessment plans meet mounting public protest

Road to hell for marine life: Shell’s Wild Coast seismic assessment plans meet mounting public protest


‘Hell no, Shell must go’ — activists protest against the arrival of the Amazon Warrior in Cape Town on Sunday. This is the ship’s last stop before it carries out a seismic assessment in search of oil and gas off the Wild Coast, starting on 1 December.


Waving banners, beating drums and chanting, an array of protesters — including members of Extinction Rebellion Cape Town, Oceans Not Oil and the Green Connection — awaited the arrival of the Amazon Warrior, a 130-metre seismic blasting vessel hired by oil giant Shell, at Cape Town Harbour on Sunday morning. From the outset, their message was clear: “Shell can go to hell”.

“Hell no, Shell must go!” the protesters chanted. Placards with defaced Shell logos on them bobbed above the crowd.

Shell has appointed Shearwater GeoServices to conduct the survey, which will last from four to five months, and cover more than 6,000km² of ocean surface. The survey area is located more than 20km from the coast, with its closest point in water depths ranging between 700m and 3km, Daily Maverick reported.

Activists protest against Shell’s offshore exploration plan along the Wild Coast at the Waterfront in Cape Town on Sunday, 21 November 2021. Shell’s announcement that it will conduct a seismic survey to probe for oil and gas along the Wild Coast has drawn outrage from the public (Photo: Victoria O’Regan)

During this time, the seismic airgun blasts will increase the cacophony of sounds in the ocean, adding to those made by whales, dolphins and other marine life. Scientists and environmentalists alike have raised serious concerns about the “disastrous effects” of seismic assessments on the marine environment.  

shell protest
People protest at the Waterfront in Cape Town on Sunday, 21 November 2021 against Shell’s offshore exploration plan to probe for oil and gas along the Wild Coast. (Photo: Victoria O’Regan)

Climate activist organisation Extinction Rebellion (XR) Cape Town has said that there is increasing evidence that seismic blasting harms marine life. “Environmentalists are extremely concerned that seismic blasting of this scale will hurt our whales during breeding seasons, possibly separating mothers from their calves. But also fishing communities are sounding the alarm since the shockwaves will also scare off and harm their catch for unknown periods,” said XR Cape Town press coordinator, Michael Wolf.

In a statement on Saturday, XR Cape Town demanded that President Cyril Ramaphosa urgently intervene and withdraw the exploration licence from Shell and its partners, and send the Amazon Warrior home. 

People protest against Shell’s offshore exploration plan off the Wild Coast and the arrival of the Amazon Warrior at the Waterfront in Cape Town on Sunday, 21 November 2021. (Photo: Victoria O’Regan)

Shell’s announcement has spurred widespread public outrage and ignited a petition campaign to stop the survey. 

The Oceans Not Oil coalition started a petition calling on Environment, Forestry and Fisheries Minister Barbara Creecy to withdraw approval of Shell’s application to probe for oil and gas off the Eastern Cape shoreline. By Sunday morning, the petition had received more than 147,500 signatories. 

About 100-150 protesters and activists were at the Clock Tower at the V&A Waterfront when Daily Maverick arrived at around 5.30am on Sunday. From there, the demonstrators marched through the Silo District, eventually arriving at the edge of a pier near Shimmy Beach Club. 

Protesters demonstrate at the Waterfront in Cape Town on Sunday, 21 November 2021 against Shell’s offshore exploration for oil and gas along the Wild Coast. (Photo: Victoria O’Regan)

For about three hours the protesters waited to “unwelcome” the Amazon Warrior to Cape Town. The ship eventually arrived in the bay at about 8.15am, but remained outside the harbour.

“The reason why we’re here today is because we’re telling Shell to go to hell. We do not approve of their want to do seismic activity across the Wild Coast because it will not only affect marine life but will affect individuals and marginalised communities,” protester and youth coordinator at the African Climate Alliance, Gabriel Klaasen, told Our Burning Planet.

Klaasen said Shell’s plans for the Wild Coast will not only affect marine life, but will have social and economic impacts on communities in the area. 

“This needs to come to an end if we want to make sure our marine life is secure for future generations to benefit from. The ocean is one of the biggest carbon sinks in the world and if we don’t protect it, we are screwing humans over,” he said. 

Strategic lead for the Green Connection, Liz McDaid addresses protesters at Sunday’s action against Shell’s plan to carry out a three-dimensional seismic survey in search of oil and gas deposits from Morgan Bay to Port St Johns off the Wild Coast, starting on 1 December. (Photo: Victoria O’Regan)

Addressing protesters on Sunday, strategic lead for the Green Connection organisation Liz McDaid said that while there are currently groups of environmental lawyers trying to find ways to stop the project, public pressure on Shell is the way forward.  

“It’s us on the ground who have the best chance of public pressure building to stop them and to shut them down,” said McDaid.

McDaid said Sunday’s action was the first in a series of rolling actions planned before 1 December. There have been protests along the Wild Coast and pickets outside Shell petrol stations across the country, she said. 

A silent march from Muizenberg to Kalk Bay harbour to raise public awareness also took place at midday on Sunday. 

People gather at the Waterfront in Cape Town on Sunday, 21 November 2021 to protest against Shell’s offshore exploration plan along the Wild Coast. Demonstrators gathered to ‘unwelcome’ the ship commissioned to conduct the survey, which docked in Cape Town on Sunday. (Photo: Victoria O’Regan)

“What we are also planning to do — if we can raise the money — is hire a research vessel to shadow and monitor” the Amazon Warrior’s activity on the Wild Coast, said McDaid. 

“What we also think will put public pressure on Shell is to call on all the holidaymakers who are driving around to boycott Shell,” she said. 

“We were at the Paradise Motors Shell garage yesterday and it was very inspiring to see people look at the posters, drive in and then drive out without getting petrol,” she said.

“As long as we can resist and they know we are resisting, it makes their lives harder.”

Source:

Victoria O’Regan at Daily Maverick



Important climate change measures for South Africa get Cabinet nod

Important climate change measures for South Africa get Cabinet nod


South Africa’s efforts to address the effects of climate change on people and the economy in a manner which leaves no one behind, recently received a firm nod from Cabinet.


The meeting approved the revised Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC), the Climate Bill and South Africa’s negotiating position for COP-26. We have also brought forward the year in which emissions are due to decline from 2035 in the initial NDC, to 2025 in the updated NDC.

As a developing country, South Africa is committed to contributing its fair share towards a global low-emissions, climate resilient economy and society by mid-century. We recognise the consequences of climate change will be catastrophic for the world, and for South Africa, in particular, without global ambitious action to reduce emissions, and address adaptation.

The latest science makes it clear that in order to prevent these catastrophic consequences, an accelerated shift to a low-emissions society is required.

South Africa in partnership with the rest of Africa is on the front-line in the global struggle against climate change and is dedicating significant resources to adapt to the reality of an already-changing climate and address consequential loss and damage.

Kouga Wind Farm in construction near Oyster Bay, Eastern Cape

Our updated Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC), was deposited with the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) recently. The submission of the updated NDC follows widespread consultation with business, organised labour, government, civil society and the Climate Commission.

South Africa has set an ambitious Nationally Determined Contribution of 420- 350 Mt CO2-eq which is compatible with Paris Agreement goals. However, to achieve such an ambitious target, developed countries must meet their financing commitments made under the UNFCCC and reaffirmed in the Paris Agreement adopted at COP 21.

In the past decade developed countries have not kept to the level of commitments on climate finance, enshrined in the Paris Agreement. In particular there has been minimal assistance to emerging economies in this regard. Accordingly, we need certainty and predictability of the quantum of financing available to us, to embark on our Just Transition.

The Presidential Climate Commission appointed in February, is tasked with bringing together the government, private sector, organised labour and civil society to advise the government on just transition pathways that will ensure our transition to a lower carbon economy that will open up new opportunities for inclusive local industrialisation and growth, job creation and re-skilling.

Fundamental to the commission’s mandate is ensuring that those most vulnerable to the consequences of the transition, particularly workers and communities in the coal value chain, are not left behind.

Cabinet has also adopted the long-awaited Climate Change Bill, an important step in the development of our country’s architecture to manage and combat climate change. The bill, which will soon be tabled in Parliament, spells out that all adaptation and mitigation efforts should be based on the best available science, evidence and information. It further gives effect to South Africa’s international commitments and obligations in relation to climate change, and defines the steps to be taken to protect and preserve the planet for the benefit of present and future generations.

The bill sets in place a mechanism to co-ordinate the government response to the effective management of climate change impacts. Through the national adaptation response, we will strengthen resilience and reduce vulnerability to climate change.

With regard to our country’s negotiating mandate for COP-26, South Africa is fully committed to a collective, multilateral approach to addressing the global challenge of climate change, with the UNFCCC at its centre.

Our position on resource mobilisation is to secure new commitments of support by developed countries for implementation by developing countries, addressing both mitigation and adaptation. We need the COP to provide clarity on and commence the process for determining a new and more ambitious goal for long-term finance, increasing beyond the $100 billion (R1 498bn) per year from 2025.

As already explained, South Africa, and many other developing countries, require the means of implementation for its adaptation and mitigation actions. This funding could come from a wide variety of sources, public and private, bilateral and multilateral, including alternative sources of finance.

With regard to adaptation, COP-26 should deliver an outcome that will enable practical progress, including launching a formal programme of work on the operationalisation of the Global Goal on Adaptation. The position that we will be taking to COP on the adaptation global goal is that we should aim to increase the resilience of the global population to climate change by at least 50% and reduce the global populations that are impacted by the adverse effects of climate change by at least 50%, by 2030 and by at least 90% by 2050.

It is particularly important that developed countries show leadership and come forward with massively enhanced support to developing countries, particularly at this time when sustainable development has been set back decades by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Source:



On the Web This Week, 7 November

On the Web This Week, 7 November

On the web this week, indoor farming takes a step forward, a volcanic eruption creates a new island, and Chile’s last circus elephant retires.

Picture credit: Bowery

If you live in the U.S., the last time you ate a salad, the lettuce inside it almost certainly came from California or Arizona. But the geography of leafy greens is very slowly starting to change as the trend of indoor farming—growing greens in large warehouses using artificial light and automated technology—expands. The latest farm to open is in Baltimore. It’s the largest, so far, from the New York-based, tech-heavy startup Bowery.

Picture credit: GeoNet

An undersea volcanic eruption in the Tongan archipelago has sunk one island and created another one that is three times larger, according to a report by geologists released on Thursday.

Taaniela Kula, of the Tonga Geological Service, said the new island is estimated to be about 100 metres wide and 400 metres long, and is situated about 120 metres west of its now-submerged predecessor, Lateiki island.

Companies seeking to cut plastic use are tapping a vast source of raw materials: ocean garbage.

Coca-Cola Co. recently unveiled a bottle made in part of recycled marine litter. Interface Inc., the world’s biggest maker of carpet tiles, is weaving rugs with yarns produced from discarded fishing nets. Startups are raising funds to fish for plastics and make new products.

Picture credit: Julian Stratenschulte / Getty Images

Electrifying transportation is one of the biggest keys to solving the looming climate crisis. With more electric vehicles on the road and fewer gas-guzzlers, drivers burn less fossil fuels and put out fewer planet-heating gases into the atmosphere. But as electric vehicles become more popular, they’re posing another environmental challenge: what to do with their batteries once they’re off the road.

Picture credit: Donald Miralle/Getty Images

This week in Los Angeles, 15,000 people will be attending one of the biggest creativity conferences in the world, Adobe MAX. It’s not the kind of event that is normally associated with conservation, but this year is different. The creative community is getting involved in coral reef conservation and it might just help save an entire ecosystem.

Picture credit: Gregory Zamell/Shutterstock

Ramba the elephant spent 50 years all alone in a circus. The Asian elephant was first forced into circus life in Argentina and later in Chile. In 1997, she was “confiscated” from a circus called Los Tachuelas because she was suffering abuse and neglect.

Despite being “confiscated,” she actually had to stay with the circus, just wasn’t able to perform anymore. After many years of hard work on behalf of Chilean NGO Ecopolis and elephant experts Scott Blais and Kat Blais, Ramba was rescued and it marks the official end of performing circus elephants in Chile.

Picture credit: Apple TV Plus

Two movies this year feature prolonged scenes in which a dung beetle pushes a piece of poop in the middle of the African savannah. One of them is an emotional journey about a leader coming to terms with the full cycle of birth, life, and death, which ends with a poignant moment in the rain. The other is the live-action Lion King.

Apple TV Plus’ nature documentary The Elephant Queen does what Disney couldn’t: imbue emotional depth to its animal subjects and crafting a sweeping narrative across the African plains.

Did you enjoy this week’s stories? Comment below and let us know! If you’re looking for eco-friendly, sustainable products for your home and/or outdoor needs, please consider one of the products below. As an Amazon Affiliate, we earn a commission on sales, which helps us to keep up our mission of keeping you entertained and informed.

On the Web This Week, 24 October

On the Web This Week, 24 October

On the web this week, Sri Lanka attempts to deal with its human-elephant relationship, scuba diving grandmothers discover an unexpected sea snake population, and a mysterious oil spill off the coast of Brazil.

Picture credit: Rachel Nuwer

“Sri Lanka has the highest level of human-elephant conflict in the world,” says Prithiviraj Fernando, chairman of the Centre for Conservation and Research in Tissamaharama. “Wherever there are people and elephants, there’s conflict.”

For more than 70 years, Sri Lanka has attempted to solve the problem by moving elephants to national parks. According to the government’s approach, the world’s second-largest land animal belongs in protected areas surrounded by electric fencing, while people belong everywhere else.

Picture credit: Claire Goiran/UNC

A group of snorkelling grandmothers who swim up to 3km five days a week have uncovered a large population of venomous sea snakes in a bay in Noumea where scientists once believed they were rare. Claire Goiran from the University of New Caledonia and Professor Rick Shine from Australia’s Macquarie University were studying a small harmless species known as the turtle‐headed sea snake located in the Baie des Citrons, but would occasionally encounter the 1.5 metre-long venomous greater sea snake, also known as the olive-headed sea snake.

Goiran and Shine believed the greater sea snake was an anomaly in the popular swimming bay as it had only been spotted about six times over 15 years. From 2013, they decided to take a closer look at the greater sea snake to better understand its importance to the bay’s ecosystem.

Picture credit: Antonello Veneri / AFP

It washed ashore in early September, thick globs of oil that appeared from out of nowhere and defied explanation. In the weeks since, the mysterious sludge — 600 tons, the largest spill in Brazil’s history — has tarred more than 1,600 kilometres of shoreline, polluted some of the country’s most beautiful beaches and killed all sorts of marine life.

But despite the time that has passed — and the damage done – the most important questions remain unanswered. Where is the oil coming from? And how can it be stopped?

Picture credit: Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Coca-Cola was found for the second year in a row to be the most polluting brand in a global audit of plastic trash conducted by the Break Free From Plastic global movement. The giant soda company was responsible for more plastic litter than the next top three polluters combined.

Reaffirming the importance of sustainable environmental practices, Stellenbosch Wine Routes this week signed the Porto Protocol, committing the leading wine route in South Africa to an accelerated contribution towards climate change mitigation.

Launched by former US President Barack Obama in 2018, the Porto Protocol is a global sustainable initiative signed by companies across numerous industries. These have pledged to play their part in employing and sharing sustainable environmental practices to combat climate change.

Picture credit: Farmer’s Weekly

Urban agriculture has a major role to play in providing healthy, affordable and accessible food to poor urban households in South Africa, according to Prof Juaneé Cilliers, chair of the Urban and Regional Planning Unit for Environmental Sciences and Management at North-West University.

Click the banner above to get a one-month free trial of Kindle Unlimited, which enables you to read thousands of books for a single monthly fee, including all the books in our reading list below:

Continuing from last week, is part two in a six-part documentary series on global cities and the development of urban networks as the emerging geography of connectivity in an age of globalization. In this part we look at the historical development of urban centers from ancient times through to the industrial revolution. Produced by: https://systemsinnovation.io

Did you enjoy this week’s stories? Comment below and let us know! If you’re looking for eco-friendly, sustainable products for your home and/or outdoor needs, please consider one of the products below. As an Amazon Affiliate, we earn a commission on sales, which helps us to keep up our mission of keeping you entertained and informed.

On the Web This Week, 18 October

On the Web This Week, 18 October

On the web this week, a Forest Of The Future planted in Johannesburg, are electric vehicles better for SA, and scientists use drones to save sacred trees in Hawaii.

 Last month, in celebration of their 100th birthday, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, together with 14 456 scholars across Gauteng, broke the record for the most number of paper planes flown at a single time.

14 456 paper planes, each containing a message from ordinary South Africans dedicated to their future selves, were launched at 15 schools across the province. Now, the brand has taken those paper planes and used them as compost for a new ‘Forest of the Future’ initiative which has been unveiled at the Mother of Peace orphanage situated in Northriding, Johannesburg.

Picture credit: Berea Mail

AROUND 60 walkers left uShaka Pier on Saturday on an intrepid 150km seven-day adventure from Durban to Mtunzini, on the KZN north coast, to raise awareness of the province’s pristine coastline while also addressing the plastic threat to our oceans.

The participants, who were all part of the Philocaly Trail (‘Philocaly’ meaning The Love of Beauty) joined Berea resident, Nikki Williamson, the force behind the initiative and passionate lover of nature, the ocean and our natural heritage on the epic journey.

Picture credit: 123RF/Bunlue Nantaprom

SA’s submission to the Paris agreement on climate change says the country will have more than 2.9-million electric vehicles (EVs) on the road by 2050, with R6.5-trillion to be invested in the industry over the next four decades.

That is a significant sum of money for a country with failing parastatals, which include its electricity supplier, Eskom. This raises the question: is it practical for SA to commit to investing this amount in electric vehicles within the next four decades?

Picture credit: UH Hilo SDAV Laboratory

In early September, a drone flew over the Waiakea Forest Reserve on Hawaii’s Big Island. It slowed its pace, lowered itself to a hover just feet from the canopy, and readied a device attached to its undercarriage. Two plastic “arms” rotated gently, grabbed a small branch, and, using a built-in saw, chopped it off. Having collected the sample, the drone flew away.

This could be the future of forestry. The operation, conducted by Ryan Perroy, a geographer at the University of Hawaii at Hilo, is part of a rescue mission to save a special tree — the sacred ʻŌhiʻa (pronounced “oh-HEE-ah”) that blankets Hawaii’s islands. For many Hawaiians, the ʻŌhiʻa is a symbol of nature, an ecological backbone, and the very essence of the forest. But the trees are under attack.

Picture credit:  David Tipling Getty Images

Scientists are discovering that the Arctic’s rising temperatures might be the second-biggest threat to wildlife.

Climate variability is increasing, as well, meaning once-rare extreme events like flash floods and droughts happen more often. It’s difficult for wildlife to cope with these pulses; animals have responded to global warming by shifting ranges and behaviors, but these dramatic changes can come too quickly for adaptation.

This is part one in a six-part documentary series on global cities and the development of urban networks as the emerging geography of connectivity in an age of globalization. Produced by: systemsinnovation.io

Did you enjoy this week’s stories? Comment below and let us know! If you’re looking for eco-friendly, sustainable products for your home and/or outdoor needs, please consider one of the products below. As an Amazon Affiliate, we earn a commission on sales, which helps us to keep up our mission of keeping you entertained and informed.

On the Web This Week, 10 October

On the Web This Week, 10 October

On the web this week, the world’s Top 20 polluters revealed, how the international cocaine trade damages the environment, and the fashion industry’s latest trend is sustainability.

Picture credit: Guardian Design

This week, The Guardian revealed the 20 fossil fuel companies whose relentless exploitation of the world’s oil, gas and coal reserves can be directly linked to more than one-third of all greenhouse gas emissions in the modern era.

New data from world-renowned researchers reveals how this cohort of state-owned and multinational firms are driving the climate emergency that threatens the future of humanity, and details how they have continued to expand their operations despite being aware of the industry’s devastating impact on the planet.

Picture credit: Reuters/Fabian Bimmer

Since nations signed on to the Paris Agreement four years ago, committing to collectively lower carbon emissions to below 2 degrees Celsius, progress across the globe has been uneven and, sometimes, even discouraging.

But there is good news. Austin, Athens, Lisbon, and Venice have joined 26 other major cities in steadily reducing their greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new analysis published by a coalition of cities known as C40, ahead of its annual World Mayors Summit in Copenhagen.

Picture credit: Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images

The Verge reports that the cocaine trade, and efforts to stop it, are causing $214.6 million in damage every year. Drug-related deforestation is also driving people out of the region, and making climate change worse.

Picture credit: New York Times

Of all the trends that emerged from fashion month, the four-week-long circuit of ready-to-wear shows in New York, London, Milan and Paris that ended last week, the one that trumped all others was neither a skirt length nor a color nor a borrowed reference. It dominated runways in every single city; it became so ubiquitous that it was almost a cliché.

Forget street wear. Sustainability was the hottest look of the day.

South Africans are being encouraged to ditch the electric stove and braai more. According to experts lighting a fire is less harmful for the environment.

“If you want to do your bit for the climate then you don’t have to give up braaing because braaing is in fact it is carbon neutral,” said Prof Bob Scholes from Global Change Institute.

Researchers have created a lightweight prosthetic limb from discarded plastic, which they say could save healthcare providers millions and help tackle pollution. The artificial limbs were made by grinding down plastic bottles and spinning the grains into polyester yarns which were heated to produce a light, sturdy substance that could be easily moulded.

If you’re concerned about your plastic usage, and would like a quality alternative, why not try one of these reusable water bottles?

Did you enjoy this week’s stories? Have a story you’d like us to cover? Leave a comment below and let us know!

On The Web This Week, 3 October

On The Web This Week, 3 October

On the web this week, Barbara Creecy calls for greater environmental literacy, a photo essay of life for Kenya’s game rangers, and Prince Harry honours soldier killed in anti-poaching operations in Malawi.

Picture Credit: Lepogo Lodges

A new safari lodge has opened in South Africa, and this one is unlike the rest.  Noka Camp part of Lepogo Lodges is believed to be the first luxury camp in Africa to offset the carbon footprint of every visiting guest.

Picture credit: Rhino unit patrol with the Big Life Foundation

Earlier this year, Intrepid Travel launched a first of its kind journey to Kenya bringing travellers into the rarely seen world of wildlife conservation rangers. Co-hosted by the non-profit The Thin Green Line Organization, the remarkable seven-day experience, Kenya: Wildlife Rangers Expedition, allowed a small group of travellers to spend a week on the front lines, immersed in the work of the Big Life Foundation and its rangers. TravelPulse brings us this picture gallery from the expedition.

Picture credit: AFP

Speaking of consrevation rangers, The Duke of Sussex has paid tribute to a British soldier killed during a counter-poaching operation in Malawi. Prince Harry laid a wreath for Mathew Talbot, 22, who was killed by an elephant in May. The duke was “honoured” to pay respects to Guardsman Talbot, who played a “huge part” in conservation efforts, a post on his Instagram account reads.

Picture credit: Reuters/Gopal Chitrakar

The Mail & Guardian published one of the best headlines I’ve ever read this week: Kung Fu Nuns Cycling For The Environment.

Picture credit: Alamy

Scientists are working to breed sheep that produce less greenhouse gases in order to reduce their impact on the environment. The Grass to Gas initiative will combine international scientific and industry expertise to measure two major factors affecting the environmental consequences of the livestock – feed efficiency and methane emissions. Its goal is to develop ways to identify animals with a lower impact, which can then be selected for breeding programmes.

And finally, if you’re thinking about growing your own vegetables, Rob Bob’s Aquaponics & Backyard Farm on youtube has this guide to starting an aquaponic garden:

Did you enjoy this week’s list? Have a story you’d like us to cover? Leave a comment below!

On the Web This Week, 26 September

On the Web This Week, 26 September

On the web this week, photography contest finalists & winners, how the video game industry is addressing climate change, and South Africa’s oldest tortoise turns 109!

Picture credit:  Dharshie Wissah/2019 Ciwem environmental photographer of the year

The Guardian brings us this picture gallery, as SL Shanth Kumar has won Ciwem environmental photographer of the year 2019 for his image of homes battered by flooding in Mumbai. This year’s winners were revealed alongside the UN climate summit in New York.

Picture credit: Wild Shots Outreach

Nineteen-year-old Kgaugelo Neville Ngomane has won a prestigious environmental photographic competition. Ngomane’s powerful image of a rhino dehorning, titled Desperate Measures, was picked from more than 4,000 international entries by the judges who commended its storytelling and photographic merit. The judges said: “When his photo flashed up on screen, there was a sharp intake of breath around the judging room; it’s such a powerful image.”

Picture credit: Peter Haygarth/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2019

The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards have chosen their finalists for 2019. Vote for the Affinity Photo People’s Choice Award here to stand a chance to win an iPad!

Picture credit: eNCA/Neil Raath

Admiral the tortoise, Durban’s living legend, turned 109 years old on Tuesday. eThekwini Municipality and residents celebrated the 109 years of his life with a fitting birthday celebration and gifts in the form of fruits and vegetables.

Picture credit: Nafisa Akabor

Planning on buying a new car this year? You may want to consider one of the top 10 most environmentally friendly cars on sale in South Africa.

Picture credit: Pixabay

Some of the biggest names in the video games industry, with a combined audience of 970 million players, have formally committed to harness the power of their platforms to take action in response to the climate crisis. Combined, these commitments from 21 companies will result in a 30 million tonne reduction of CO2 emissions by 2030, will see millions of trees planted, new “green nudges” in game design and improvements to energy management, packaging, and device recycling.

Picture credit: Julian Bailey

And finally, from Metal Hammer, if you’re a fan of loud music, you may want to check out these 5 furious bands fighting back for the environment.

Did you enjoy these stories? Leave us a comment below, and come back next week for more!

On The Web This Week, 19 September

On The Web This Week, 19 September

On the web this week, the Global Climate Strike, trees planted on Robben Island and South Africa’s first road made from waste plastic.

Picture credit: Leon Neal/Getty Images

According to a new poll taken in eight countries, a majority of the public recognise the climate crisis as an “emergency” and say politicians are failing to tackle the problem, backing the interests of big oil over the wellbeing of ordinary people. The survey, which comes before what is expected to be the world’s biggest climate demonstrations on Friday, found that climate breakdown is viewed as the most important issue facing the world, ahead of migration, terrorism and the global economy, in seven out of the eight countries surveyed. If you’re interested in joining tomorrow’s historic Climate Strike, details of demonstrations across South Africa will be included at the bottom of this post.

Picture credit: Roger de la Harpe

Timeslive.co.za reports that a hundred and one indigenous trees were planted on Robben Island on Wednesday in celebration of late former president Nelson Mandela’s 101st birthday this year, as the first part of an initiative which will see 10,000 trees planted on the island over the next 5 years.

Picture credit: dotsure.co.za

Businesstech.co.za reports on a pilot program in the Eastern Cape which aims to use plastic waste to build roads. The technology has been used both in Africa and internationally, including Australia, Canada, Ghana, India, Kenya, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, the United Kingdom and the United States of America.

Mother-and-daughter team Anna Hartebeest and Harriet Matjila have built Makhabisi Recycling into an inclusive green business that has created decent jobs for 60 people. 

Picture credit: Ton Kung / Shutterstock

Yes, big changes are needed, but little ones add up. These 20 simple lifestyle choices from Reader’s Digest can reduce your carbon footprint—and make a major impact.

GLOBAL YOUTH CLIMATE STRIKE / MAY 24, 2019. Over 500 students and other youth advocates across the Philippines joined today’s global youth climate strike in Manila, Philippines. LEO M. SABANGAN II.

And finally, the largest Climate Strike in history is happening worldwide tomorrow, 20 September 2019. If you’d like to join in, the details for demonstrations in South Africa’s major cities is as follows:

Johannesburg: Assemble at Pieter Roos Park, Corner of Victoria Ave and Empire Road, 10am

Durban: Assemble at the ICC , 11am

Pretoria: Assemble at the Union Buildings, 11am

Assemble: at The Greens, Corner of Cambridge & Keizergracht streets, 12am

There will also be a demonstration held outside the Eskom offices in Cape town, starting at 11am

Copac and the South African Food Sovereignty Coalition will be forming a human chain outside the Sasol offices in Sandton, 10am.

If you’re planning to attend any of these protests, please remember to bring plenty of water with you, as it can be difficult to stay properly hydrated outdoors and in large crowds. And finally, if you are attending the protests (or already have, depending on when you read this) leave us a comment below, or email any pictures you’d like to share to editor@lighthouse-eco.co.za